News

The Scottish Commission for Learning Disability (SCLD) has today published the Employment Task Group report to Scottish Government Ministers.

The report, titled The Route to Employment for People with Learning Disabilities in Scotland, explores what needs to be done to create more and better employment opportunities for Scots with a learning disability.

The report states 4 priorities for action:

The Government has published a line manager's guide to employing people with a disability. It's been produced by the Disability Confident scheme in collaboration with CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development.

The guidance focuses on the role of the line manager in workplace adjustments, langauge and behaviour and sickness absence. It also provides guidance on recruiting, retaining and developing employees with a disability or health condition.

The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Esther McVey, has announced increased funding to support businesses that provide extra employment support for disabled people with the greatest barriers to work.

When the Work Choice employment programme ends in March 2019, ongoing support will be offered to individuals working in Supported Businesses through specially designed new elements of the government’s Access to Work scheme.

Welsh Social Care Minister, Huw Irranca-Davies, has announced a new strategy to transform support for people with a learning disability to ensure they have what they need to lead successful lives.

BASE has been working with the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) to produce some guidelines for local authorities to help them raise the employment rates of adults with disabilities.

The Work and Pensions committee has called on the Government to do more to promote the use of assistive technology (AT) to help more disabled people into work. Its report says it can help to close the disability employment gap and improve national productivity.

The report details how the technology can greatly help the employment prospects of people currently claiming benefits, and help them to control their home environments when it is integrated with computers, phones and gadgets.

The Work and Pensions Committee published its Seventh Report of Session 2016–17, Disability employment gap (HC 56) on 3 February 2017.

The Government’s response was received on 30 November 2017 and is attached. 

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmworpen/652/652...

The government has set out plans to help more disabled people into work over the next decade. Under 50% of people with a disability are in work compared with 80% of non-disabled people. These employment rates fall to just 5.8% for people with a learning disability.

We are expecting further investment in supported internships and Access to Work will be "significantly enhanced" over the coming year. The paper also points to "new targeted support for learning disabled social service users and secondary mental health support service users".

A report Barriers to Work, commissioned by Inclusion London, has found evidence of significant problems with the Government’s disability employment support programme, Access to Work

The report recommends ways to improve Access to Work and reduce the adverse impacts that changes to the scheme are currently having on deaf and disabled people reliant on it to stay in employment. The recommendations have been put together and are supported by deaf and disabled people under the #StopChanges2AtW campaign.

Currently, fewer than 6% of people with learning disabilities are in paid work. We know this figure represents a drop from previous years. 

We know that people with learning disabilities can and do make hard working and enthusiastic employees, bringing new skills, talents and perspectives to their employers.  We also know that when we give good quality support to people interested in work we can match their skills, interests and aspirations to the needs of local employers and get good outcomes.

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