Commissioning

Publisher: 
BASE
Topics: 
BASE, Training, Disability, Education & training, Commissioning, Supported employment
Year of Publication: 
2016
Type: 
Report

This document brings together our policy aims for the disability and employment sector. The document was updated in 2016 by the National Executive Committee.

Publisher: 
Policy & research organisations
Topics: 
Commissioning, Supported employment
Year of Publication: 
2011
Type: 
Guidance

This publication summarises the learning from work undertaken by NDTi around supporting people with learning disabilities and people with mental health problems into paid work. Conclusions include that there is:

Think Local Act Personal is organising a great series of webinars about the design and operations of the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The scheme funds social care, including employment support, across Australia. The first webinar took place recently and you can view it below.

Older jobseekers in the Greater Manchester area will be the first to trial targeted new approaches being developed to help over-50s get back to work.  

The Centre for Ageing Better, Greater Manchester Combined Authority, and the Department of Work & Pensions have announced plans for the ‘Greater Manchester Employment Support for Over-50s' pilot programme to improve support models for older people. An estimated 800,000 people in the UK aged 50 to 65 want to be working but are not, with many caught in an ‘unemployment trap’. Losing a job after the age of 50 is more likely to lead to long-term unemployment or inactivity compared with job loss at younger ages.  

The Centre for Social Justice has published a new report, Commissioning Excellence in Disability , that examines DWP's nationally contracted disability employment provision. 

The report is critical of performance over recent years and highlights some of the problem areas including commissioning processes, funding models and supply chain management. It suggests ways of making better use of the expertise within the voluntary sector and makes a series of recommendations.

Publisher: 
Policy & research organisations
Topics: 
DWP, Disability employment gap, Commissioning
Year of Publication: 
2020
Type: 
Report

This report, from the Centre for Social Justice, assesses DWP's nationally contracted disability employment provision. The report is critical of performance over recent years and highlights some of the problem areas including commissioning processes, funding models and supply chain management. It suggests ways of making better use of the expertise within the voluntary sector and makes a series of recommendations.

The Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, Justin Tomlinson, has said that he wants to explore giving more autonomy to Jobcentre Plus work coaches so that they can allocate funding to commission local projects to help get people back into work. Speaking at a Westminster Business Forum event on disability in the workplace, he said that "we do need to look closely about moving away from a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach where people are sat round a circle and taught how to do a CV, and how to do their interview".

DWP has written to all local authority Chief Executives to ask their help in mapping Supported Employment provision across the country. The letter marks the next phase in designing a follow up to the Supported Employment proof of concept which finished last month. 

The letter contains a questionnaire asking for details of local provision and asking whether authorities would be interested in participating in future trials. We recommend that all providers contact their local authority Chief Executive to flag up the importance of the letter.

NHS England has announced a major expansion of a landmark scheme designed to help tens of thousands of patients with serious mental health problems who want to work, to find employment.
The voluntary scheme, known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), is being rolled out to 28 new local NHS areas, meaning eight out of ten parts of England will have access to the programme.

Greater Manchester has set a target of achieving 7% employment rates for people with learning disabilities across all of the Greater Manchester boroughs by 2020. The target is included within its GM Learning Disability Strategy and flagged up in a letter to all authorities in the region.

The letter, from Lord Smith of Leigh, the Chair of Greater Manchester Health and Care Board, states:

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