Access To Work

DWP has published details of Access to Work statistics from 2007 to 2019. 32,010 people had applications for support approved in 2018-19 and inflation-adjusted spending has increased to exceed 2010 levels for the first time in 5 years. Total expenditure for 2018-19 was just over £129m.

Full details can be found on the DWP website.

 

 

DWP has announced that, from 1 April 2019, people will now be able to claim up to £59,200 annually to help pay for additional support that they may need in the workplace through the government’s Access to Work scheme. This can include workplace adaptations, assistive technology, transport and interpreters.

It comes after the government increased the cap by almost a third last year. Now, even more people will be able to benefit, especially those from the deaf community who can get BSL interpreters through the scheme.

Publisher: 
BASE
Topics: 
Access To Work
Year of Publication: 
2018
Type: 
Consultation

BASE and SUSE conducted a survey about Access to Work in the summer of 2018. A total of 149 responses were received and this report summarise the feedback that we obtained.

The feedback was varied but many respondents found the process of applying for Access to Work and claiming costs to be difficult. Most respondents were claiming between £25 and £30 per hour for job coaching support.

 

The Minister for Disabled People has announced a new Tech Fund as part of Access to Work, offering employers significant savings on the cost of assistive technology. The announcement follows the Work and Pensions inquiry into assistive technology.

The cost of assistive technology required by disabled employees will now be waived for all employers under the new Tech Fund.

The Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, Sarah Newton, said:

Esther McVey has announced that the maximum cap on Access to Work payments will be raised to £57,000 per year. This is a £15,000 rise on the current cap which was introduced in 2015. The new cap will apply to new claimants from April 2018. The new cap will now become double the average annual wage.

A report Barriers to Work, commissioned by Inclusion London, has found evidence of significant problems with the Government’s disability employment support programme, Access to Work

The report recommends ways to improve Access to Work and reduce the adverse impacts that changes to the scheme are currently having on deaf and disabled people reliant on it to stay in employment. The recommendations have been put together and are supported by deaf and disabled people under the #StopChanges2AtW campaign.

Topics: 
Access To Work
Year of Publication: 
2017
Type: 
Guidance

Access to Work is now using a specific medical form in connection with claims for travel to work. The new form can be completed by someone that knows the individual really well, giving a clear indication why the person needs support with Travel to Work. Once completed this then needs to be signed by a medical professional to verify that the information is accurate. This could be the GP, Practice Nurse, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, Learning Disability Nurse but it can’t be signed by a non-medical person such as Social Worker or Support worker.

Publisher: 
Central Government
Topics: 
Fluctuating health conditions, Learning disabilities, Access To Work
Year of Publication: 
2017
Type: 
Guidance

Access to Work is a specialist disability service from Jobcentre Plus that gives practical advice and support to disabled people, whether they are working, self-employed or looking for employment.

Access to Work is provided where someone needs support or adaptations beyond the reasonable adjustments which an employer is legally obliged to provide under the Equality Act.

Publisher: 
Central Government
Topics: 
Access To Work, Supported Internships
Year of Publication: 
2015
Type: 
Guidance

From September 2013, young people on or about to start the work experience placement of a supported internship, or traineeship with a disability or health condition, can apply to the Department for Work and Pensions' Access to Work fund. Young people can apply for: * funding of travel (providing assistance for additional travel costs to and from their work experience placement because of their disability); * the costs of support workers, including job coaches; and * specialist equipment for days that a young person is at the employer's premises.

Publisher: 
Local Government
Topics: 
Welfare reform, Access To Work, Local Government, Policy, Work Choice, Work Programme
Year of Publication: 
2015
Type: 
Report

The Local Government Association has published Realising Talent: a new framework for devolved employment and skills. It is the final report in a collaborative series with the Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion. It recommends options for the devolution of employment and skills, which LGA believes can be practicably implemented by a new or returning Government.

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